Category Archives: Regionalism

Moratorium on The Hill (8/23/2014)

Today, the Hill is struggling – a shadow of what it once was, but can no longer be: a place entirely dependent on students and their spending; where three months of summer was a welcome respite. The land is simply too valuable to sit relatively idle for that long. We need responsible adults to hang out there year-round.

The Hill ought to be Boulder’s hot spot: a place where young entrepreneurs, talented students and neighbors of all ages cross paths regularly in an environment designed to promote and nurture creative collisions. If you prefer to go to sleep early or the sound of parties sets your teeth on edge, you might not want to live there, but students who could care less what the neighbors think should live elsewhere, too.

Many plans have been developed for the Hill. The best of them see the inherent tension associated with conflicting student, neighborhood and business interests as, instead, the Hill’s seeds for greatness. Well-served by transit, but still somewhat dependent on the automobile, underground parking, first floor retail, second floor office and upper floor workforce and student housing will all be needed to create the critical mass essential to make this potential university village/neighborhood center thrive.

The streetscape and the bricks and mortar should reflect every Hill constituency (including neighbors, empty-nesters and families), students, faculty, and university employees), plus offices, retail, and restaurants prepared to feed off each other. The sooner, the better.

Land Assembly Improves Neighborhoods, May Serve In-Commuters

January 25, 2014

When asked how to find out what in-commuters would buy or rent in order to live in Boulder and avoid their daily  commute, I suggested that we should ASK them. Radical notion, but I’m glad the City has finally decided to do it. Continue reading Land Assembly Improves Neighborhoods, May Serve In-Commuters

Why You Should Support Ed Byrne For City Council (from the candidate)

Hello. My name is Ed Byrne. In 1981, my wife, Anne, and I moved to Boulder because we thought it would be the best place in the world to raise a family. It was. Conor, Erin and Kathleen thrived at Foothill Elementary, Centennial Middle School and Boulder High, and we’re very grateful. Continue reading Why You Should Support Ed Byrne For City Council (from the candidate)

Secession Proposed by Weld County

June 15, 2013

With a slim majority, Democrats pass some modest gun registration and rural electric energy mix laws and it’s time to form a new state? Seriously? An absence of moderates has few from either party problem-solving together in our current state capitol; how does forming a new one meaningfully bridge this divide?
Continue reading Secession Proposed by Weld County

Open Space Tax Extension 2013

May 11, 2013

Will there ever come a time when the City will finally declare victory concerning the open space acquisition program? If we are able to complete the right-of-way acquisitions, if any, needed to complete a bicycle trail circumnavigation of Boulder, may we conclude that success has been achieved?
Continue reading Open Space Tax Extension 2013

Water Shortages in 2013

April 6, 2013

Shortly after the first settlers arrived in Colorado, water started flowing towards money. In many ways, it was a brilliant scheme for a region west of the 100th meridian, where long periods of drought are to be expected. The people who contributed their sweat and toil to divert water that would otherwise rush unimpeded to the Arkansas, Colorado and Missouri rivers, derived profit from their labor. 150 years later, we struggle with the monetization of this critical human resource, but the concept of “highest and best use,” coupled with capital markets that flex enough to reward efficiency, may yet save the day.
Continue reading Water Shortages in 2013

Colorado Legislative Priorities

January 12, 2013

First, do no harm. Second, starve the trivial, feed the significant. Third,. the enemy of good is perfect. Fourth, water flows towards money. Fifth, government must know its limitations. For Colorado governance, that about sums it up. We don’t need to starve our beast, it’s already on life support. No one wants to pay more taxes, but should we consider doing so to secure our own future? To avoid squandering our children’s?
Continue reading Colorado Legislative Priorities

Boulder County 2100 (ca. 2012)

December 29, 2012

It is the year 2100. Residents of Boulder County and their regional neighbors are 90 years into their pattern-changing experiment in sustainable community development. Guided by practical wisdom, sound science and an entrepreneurial spirit, they have evolved new land use and development patterns that reconnect them to thriving ecosystems and agricultural zones, support a variety of dense, walkable village centers and nurture a diverse population of young and old, low-income and affluent, and people of all races and creeds.
Continue reading Boulder County 2100 (ca. 2012)

Eldora EIS Project Support

July 21, 2012

I support the Eldora Mountain Resort (EMR) improvements. They involve the expenditure of millions of dollars for new high-speed, wind-resistant lifts and on-mountain facilities. Eyeballing the Master Plan, more than 95% of the new trails lie within the existing permit area or on private land. Two small triangular additions on the south side permit the new Jolly Jug express lift to be added, providing additional intermediate trails and a second Challenge summit access option. Extending the northern boundary line about 300 feet to create additional runs and the express Pacer lift will provide accessible runs and a lift operable even in windy conditions on the Corona side.
Continue reading Eldora EIS Project Support

Chautauqua Parking Test Program

April 21, 2012

The beatings will continue until morale improves — or should I say, parking tickets will be issued until we leave our cars at home. Motor vehicles are considered a suspect class in Boulder, so driving disincentives abound. However, our land use patterns require most people to drive almost everywhere to do almost anything.
Continue reading Chautauqua Parking Test Program